OpenDJ 3.0.0 has been released…

FR_plogo_org_FC_openDJ-300x86As part of the release of the ForgeRock Identity Platform that we did last week, we’ve released a major version of our Directory Services product : OpenDJ 3.0.0.

The main and most important change in OpenDJ 3.0 is the work on the backend layer, with the introduction of a new backend database, supported by a new low level key-value store. When installing a new instance of OpenDJ, administrators now have the choice of creating a JE Backend (which is based on Berkeley DB Java Edition, as with previous releases of OpenDJ), or a PDB Backend (which is based on the new PersistIt library). When upgrading, the existing local backends will be transparently upgraded in JE Backends, but indexes will need to be rebuilt (and can be rebuilt automatically during the upgrade process).

Both backends have the same capabilities, and very similar performances. Most importantly, both backends benefit from a number of improvements compared with previous releases : the size of databases and index records are smaller, some indexes have been reworked to deliver better performances both for updates and reads. Overall, we’ve been increasing the throughput of Adding/Deleting entries in OpenDJ by more than 15 %.

But the 2 backends are different, especially in the way they deal with database compression. Because of the way it’s dealing with journals and compression, the new PDB backend may deliver better overall throughput, but may increase its disk occupancy significantly under heavy load (it favours updates over compression). Once the throughput is reduced under a certain threshold, compression will be highly effective and the overall disk occupancy will be optimised.

A question I often get is “Which backend should I use? “. And I don’t have a definitive answer. If you have an OpenDJ instance and you’re upgrading to 3.0, keep the JE Backend. This is a simple and automated upgrade. If you’re installing a new instance of OpenDJ, then I would say it’s a matter of risks. We don’t have the same wide experience with the PDB backend than we have had with the JE backend over the last 10 years. So, if you want to be really safe, chose the JE Backend. If you have time to test, stage your directory service before putting it in production, you might want to go with the PDB Backend. As, moving forward, we will focus our performance testing and improvements on the PDB backend essentially.

That’s all for now. In a followup post, I will continue to review the changes in OpenDJ 3.0…

Meanwhile, you can download OpenDJ 3.0 from ForgeRock’s BackStage and start playing with it. And check the Release Notes for more information.

PS: The followup posts have been published:

New version of ForgeRock Identity Platform™

This week, we have announced the release of the new version of the ForgeRock Identity Platform, which brings new services in the following areas :

  • Continuous Security at Scale
  • Security for Internet of Things (IoT)
  • Enhanced Data Privacy Controls


This is also the first identity management solution to fully implement the User-Managed Access (UMA) standard, making it possible for organizations to address expanding privacy regulations and establish trusted digital relationships. See the article that Eve Maler, VP of Innovation at ForgeRock and Chief UMAnitarian posted to explain UMA and what it can do for you.

A more in depth description of the new features of the ForgeRock Identity Platform has also been posted.

The ForgeRock Identity Platform is available for download now at

In future posts, I will detail what is new in the Directory Services part, built on the OpenDJ project.

LDAPCon 2015

22494196563_56cdbd5a6c_zTime flies… LDAPCon 2015 has happened and we all have returned from Edinburgh to our daily lives.

As for the previous editions, this year’s conference was well attended, very friendly, with plenty of time to socialize around a (few) pint(s) of beer.

23126811911_71434b0311_mDavid Goodman started the conference with a keynote presentation that illustrated the long path followed by LDAP, but also how important it still is in the major industries, especially in the Telco world.

My 2 presentations were given on the first day of the conference. The first one was about “LDAP Asynchronous Programming” and the Promises API we’ve added in the OpenDJ LDAP SDK.

The second presentation was an update on the OpenDJ project with a highlight on what is in the OpenDJ 3.0 release due mid December.

All of the presentations are already available through the web site, either in the Programme section, or directly in the Downloads section.

Thanks and kudos to this year’s organisers : Andrew Findlay and Stephen Quinney.

As usual, you can get a glimpse of the conference and people on my photo album.

LDAPCon 2015 photo album by Ludovic Poitou
LDAPCon 2015

LDAPCon is this week…

Starting Wednesday with tutorials, and the main conference on Thursday and Friday, the 5th International LDAP Conference happens in Edinburg, this week.

I will be there during the 3 days, along with several members of the OpenDJ team. I hope to see you there.

ForgeRock is a platinium sponsor of the conference. We are offering a free pass to the conference. If you can be in Edinburg at the end of the week and you are interested, please reach out to me.

Learning Curve

A few years ago I had the pleasure to work with Rajesh Rajasekharan at Sun. He was an efficient trainer on Sun products and especially on Sun Directory Server. He recently joined ForgeRock and has started a series of blog posts and screen-casts on ForgeRock products and especially OpenDJ, but not only !

If you are getting started with the products or want to see demos of them, there’s no better place than to be on the “Learning Curve


OpenDJ Nightly Builds…

For the last few months, there’s been a lot of changes in the OpenDJ project in order to prepare the next major release : OpenDJ 3.0.0. While doing so, we’ve tried to keep options opened and continued to make most of the changes in the trunk/opends part, keeping the possibility to release a 2.8 version. And we’ve made tons of work in branches as well as in trunk/opendj. As part of the move to the trunk, we’ve changed the factory to now build with Maven. Finally, at the end of last week, we’ve made the switch on the nightly builds and are now building what will be OpenDJ 3, from the trunk.

For those who are regularly checking the nightly builds, the biggest change is going to be the version number. The new build is now showing a development version of 3.0.

$ start-ds -V
Build 20150506012828
 Name Build number Revision number
Extension: snmp-mib2605 3.0.0-SNAPSHOT 12206

We are still missing the MSI package (sorry to the Windows users, we are trying to find the Maven plugin that will allow us to build the package in a similar way as previously with ant), and we are also looking at restoring the JNLP based installer, but otherwise OpenDJ 3 nightly builds are available for testing, in different forms : Zip, RPM and Debian packages.

OpenDJ Nightly Builds at

We have also changed the minimal version of Java required to run the OpenDJ LDAP directory server. Java 7 or higher is required.

We’re looking forward to getting your feedback.

Linux AD Integration with OpenDJ – by Pieter Baele

This week I stumbled upon this presentation done by Pieter Baele, about the integration of Linux, Microsoft AD and OpenDJ, to build a secure efficient naming and security enterprise service.

The presentation covers the different solutions to provide integrated authentication and naming services for Linux and Windows, and described more in depth one built with OpenDJ. Overall, it has very good information for the system administrators that need to address this kind of integration between the Linux and the Windows world.

Screen Shot 2015-04-03 at 00.21.10